Ten steps to avoid success….

Planning to do a big event this year?  Whether it is a Spring marathon, major Summer sportive, or you are stepping up to the iconic Ironman distance, here are:

Ten ways to guarantee that you won’t finish your target event!

Failure is not a pretty sight….and the bus ride back to the start can take longer than actually riding!

 

 

  1. Don’t pay any thought to your training. Just go and exercise when you feel like it. It’ll be all right on the day.
  2. Eat as much as you like. You’ll be burning so many calories in training that it won’t matter what you eat.
  3. Don’t worry about checking your equipment before you travel to the race. There’ll be a sports shop near the start if you need anything, and even if it is 7am on a Sunday morning it’ll still be open.
  4. Back in the 1960’s, marathon runners used to train without drinking water because they believed that their bodies would adapt to being constantly dehydrated. It didn’t do them any harm, so don’t worry if it’s 35ºC in the shade and you’ve only got a 500 ml water bottle to last for an event lasting four or more hours.
  5. Get a copy of a training plan from your favourite pro athlete. Just because they are among the best in the world and are full-time athletes doesn’t mean that you can’t cope with the same training load. If you do the same training as Lance Armstrong, you’ll win the Tour seven times: right?
  6. Get a heart rate monitor, or even better a power meter (if you are a cyclist or triathlete). You don’t have to work out how to use it; just wearing it and writing down your results will make you go faster.
  7. If you start to feel really tired in the build-up to your race, it’s probably because you are not training hard enough. If after doing 20 hours a week of interval training you are fatigued, doing 25 hours the next week will get you back on form.
  8. Don’t check your travel arrangements if you are going abroad to race. If you’ve spent a year training for one event, it’s really not worth bothering to check that you can get to the start line on time.
  9. Even if you’ve never ridden in a group before, you’ll be right at home among the 8500 riders on the start line in the Étape du Tour. There’s no need to practise group riding in training; just watch a couple of Tour de France DVDs before you go.  The same goes for running in a large group, you’ll have no problems dancing around the feet of others around you.
  10. Every year in the London Marathon around 30% of runner with accepted entries fail to even make the start line.  Likewise around 25% of starter in the Etape du Tour fail to reach the finish.  Don’t worry, these athletes were just unlucky; it’s not down to lack of preparation or training. It won’t happen to you, will it?

If you want to avoid these (and many more) pitfalls, contact us to help with your training and preparation!

Look forward to hearing from you

Garry